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Winnipeg Jazz Orchestra - Tidal Currents: East Meets West / A unique big band commission from two of Canada's leading jazz composers, inspired by the bodies of water with which they grew up / Inside the Wave by Jill Townsend: Inside the Wave was inspired by the rugged west coast and majestic ocean waves near Sooke, BC. The opening theme played by the saxes represents the waves as they uncurl and unfold onto the shore. An abrupt change of meter and feel midway through the movement emphasizes the unpredictable character of coastal weather. Crossing Lachine by Christine Jensen: This is inspired by my current love for paddle boarding across the St. Lawrence river right at the base of the Lachine Rapids in Montreal. During the summer, I let go with the most thrilling paddles on this majestic body of water, full of currents whirling around me. At the same time I am able to glide fast over them, while looking at stunning horizons and this unique vista on water. Tidal Currents by Jill Townsend: Small waves washing over tiny rocks close to the shore are reimagined using the sounds of piano, bass, drums, and muted brass. As with tidal currents, the music also ebbs and flows. Cascading horns provide backdrop for the beautiful sound of Christine Jensen's soprano sax. Rock Skipping Under the Half Moon by Christine Jensen: This composition is inspired by my birthplace of Sechelt, British Columbia. I practiced rock skipping there, on the beautiful Sechelt Inlet with the gorgeous coastal mountains in the shadows. This piece starts out with the shimmer sounds of the small inlet waves calling us down to the shoreline. With two notes, we start the practice of rock skipping. The theme also takes place over the swaying rhythms of a slow waltz that mimics the feel of lapping of waves on the shoreline. It gets extended, as I continue to climb intervallically with the lines, pulling them longer and higher, again alluding to achieving a longer row of rock skips with the end.
Winnipeg Jazz Orchestra - Tidal Currents: East Meets West / A unique big band commission from two of Canada's leading jazz composers, inspired by the bodies of water with which they grew up / Inside the Wave by Jill Townsend: Inside the Wave was inspired by the rugged west coast and majestic ocean waves near Sooke, BC. The opening theme played by the saxes represents the waves as they uncurl and unfold onto the shore. An abrupt change of meter and feel midway through the movement emphasizes the unpredictable character of coastal weather. Crossing Lachine by Christine Jensen: This is inspired by my current love for paddle boarding across the St. Lawrence river right at the base of the Lachine Rapids in Montreal. During the summer, I let go with the most thrilling paddles on this majestic body of water, full of currents whirling around me. At the same time I am able to glide fast over them, while looking at stunning horizons and this unique vista on water. Tidal Currents by Jill Townsend: Small waves washing over tiny rocks close to the shore are reimagined using the sounds of piano, bass, drums, and muted brass. As with tidal currents, the music also ebbs and flows. Cascading horns provide backdrop for the beautiful sound of Christine Jensen's soprano sax. Rock Skipping Under the Half Moon by Christine Jensen: This composition is inspired by my birthplace of Sechelt, British Columbia. I practiced rock skipping there, on the beautiful Sechelt Inlet with the gorgeous coastal mountains in the shadows. This piece starts out with the shimmer sounds of the small inlet waves calling us down to the shoreline. With two notes, we start the practice of rock skipping. The theme also takes place over the swaying rhythms of a slow waltz that mimics the feel of lapping of waves on the shoreline. It gets extended, as I continue to climb intervallically with the lines, pulling them longer and higher, again alluding to achieving a longer row of rock skips with the end.
875531026443
Tidal Currents: East Meets West
Artist: Winnipeg Jazz Orchestra
Format: CD
New: Available $9.99
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Formats and Editions

DISC: 1

1. Inside the Wave
2. Crossing Lachine
3. Tidal Currents
4. Rock Skipping Under the Half Moon

More Info:

Winnipeg Jazz Orchestra - Tidal Currents: East Meets West / A unique big band commission from two of Canada's leading jazz composers, inspired by the bodies of water with which they grew up / Inside the Wave by Jill Townsend: Inside the Wave was inspired by the rugged west coast and majestic ocean waves near Sooke, BC. The opening theme played by the saxes represents the waves as they uncurl and unfold onto the shore. An abrupt change of meter and feel midway through the movement emphasizes the unpredictable character of coastal weather. Crossing Lachine by Christine Jensen: This is inspired by my current love for paddle boarding across the St. Lawrence river right at the base of the Lachine Rapids in Montreal. During the summer, I let go with the most thrilling paddles on this majestic body of water, full of currents whirling around me. At the same time I am able to glide fast over them, while looking at stunning horizons and this unique vista on water. Tidal Currents by Jill Townsend: Small waves washing over tiny rocks close to the shore are reimagined using the sounds of piano, bass, drums, and muted brass. As with tidal currents, the music also ebbs and flows. Cascading horns provide backdrop for the beautiful sound of Christine Jensen's soprano sax. Rock Skipping Under the Half Moon by Christine Jensen: This composition is inspired by my birthplace of Sechelt, British Columbia. I practiced rock skipping there, on the beautiful Sechelt Inlet with the gorgeous coastal mountains in the shadows. This piece starts out with the shimmer sounds of the small inlet waves calling us down to the shoreline. With two notes, we start the practice of rock skipping. The theme also takes place over the swaying rhythms of a slow waltz that mimics the feel of lapping of waves on the shoreline. It gets extended, as I continue to climb intervallically with the lines, pulling them longer and higher, again alluding to achieving a longer row of rock skips with the end.
        
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